How much is the Beatles Revolver LP worth?

Collection REVOLVER records The Beatles Vinyl LP

Revolver was the album that marked the fab four’s career as psychedelic. With great contrasts such as “Taxman” (rock), “Tomorrow Never Knows” (psychedelic), “Eleanor Rigby” (with a string quartet) and “Yellow Submarine” (with submarine sound effects and tavern song, typical of Germanic, English or Irish traditions).

On “I’m Only Sleeping,” Harrison played the notes for the lead guitar (and for the second guitar in the solo) in reverse order, then reversed the tape and mixed it. The “reverse” guitar sound gave the song a more sleepy, sinister and melancholy tone. This, along with the backwards lyrics used in the Beatles’ song “Rain” (recorded at the sessions and released separately, as a single) was the first case of a reverse message, which Lennon discovered after mistakenly loading a reel-to-reel tape backwards while under the influence of marijuana.

However, the experimentation in these songs appears overshadowed by Lennon on “Tomorrow Never Knows,” which was one of the first psychedelic songs, and such innovative techniques as reverse guitar, processed effects, vocal and tape winding. Musically, it is based almost exclusively on a single chord, and the lyrics are inspired by the “Tibetan Book of the Dead” in Timothy Leary’s translation, although the title came from a phrase that Ringo always repeated.

Red and Blue Collection The Beatles 1962-1966 | 1967-1970

This was one of the factors that led the band to decide to retire from the stage: John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr found it impossible to transfer to live performances the whole palette of sounds included in their recordings, in which string quartets, wind instruments, oriental sounds and varied sound effects began to appear.

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A circumstance in which George Martin, the group’s producer from the beginning and the one who encouraged the innovative spirit that became a trademark for the Liverpool quartet, had a lot to do with.

Revolver is also the album that consolidated the figure of George Harrison as a composer, a task in which until then he had been overshadowed by the tandem Lennon and McCartney. Up to three songs, including the opening “Taxman”, bore the signature of the youngest member of the band, who would gradually establish himself as a third way while the group was heading towards its inevitable end.

Much has been written about Revolver’s debt to drugs, especially LSD, with which the members of the quartet had been experimenting for some time. It is not easy to know to what extent songs like “Tomorrow never knows” would have been what they are without the influence of acid.

LP VINYL RECORD, THE BEATLES “REVOLVER”.

As pictured. Matrix 7TSO 1994 and 1995. Conditions: 1) No trade/no exchange/no reply to these messages. 2) Payment: deposit in account or in hand. 3) Hand delivery: Santander, possible surroundings. 4) I don’t use wallapay services, or wallaenvios or direct purchases. We have a chat for this purpose. 5) Shipping: at the decision, cost and responsibility of the buyer, if any (for insurance or blows in the shipment).20 EUR

INDIVISIBLE 1 – EVERYBODY’S TRYING TO BE MY BABY + EVERY LITTLE THING / WHAT YOU’RE DOING + I DON’T WANT TO SPOIL THE PARTY 2 – LITTLE CHILD+ TILL THERE WAS YOU / PLEASE MISTER POSTMAN + HOLD ME TIGHT Vinyl in perfect condition, cookies and sleeves as shown in pictures. I combine shipments.6 EUR

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There were signs before, on “Help!” and “Rubber Soul,” in particular, but nothing like this. Everything that came out after Revolver was molded and shaped in some way by the Beatles’ seventh LP. As far as historical records go, it may be the most important album of the ’60s for several reasons.

The album’s 14 tracks, as well as the single “Paperback Writer” / “Rain” recorded at the sessions but released in early May, go directly in this brave new direction. It is the first rock album that was truly put together as a complete piece. Frank Sinatra had been exploring the concept for over a decade, but most pop and rock artists still had the mentality that singles drove sales and LPs were an afterthought in the marketplace.

Even Harrison’s “Love You To,” his second sitar-based song after “Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)” from “Rubber Soul,” sneaks onto the record with little effort (unlike the mundane “Within You Without from Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” You “, which always seemed out of place amid that album’s paisley-colored nostalgia).